Hot off the press!

Edit Apr 7: added cool pictures from Ellie.

Research group alumnus Ellie Rotheray (who defended her PhD last year) has recently had yet another of her thesis chapters published in the Journal of Insect Conservation. The experiment in question involved a lot of painstaking field work marking and recapturing the rare aspen hoverfly, Hammerschmidtia ferruginea, and observing the dispersal patterns and territorial behaviour of adults.

Here's a marked fly (note the yellow dot on the  thorax) shortly after being painted

Here’s a marked Hammerschmidtia hoverfly (note the yellow dot on the thorax) shortly after being painted

 

 

 

Obligatory gratuitous sex shot. Here's why a male puts in long hours patrolling the long. Oh yeah!

Obligatory gratuitous sex shot. Here’s why a male puts in long hours patrolling the aspen log. Oh yeah!      Edit Apr 7: not a sex shot after all. This is some male-on-male action, which Ellie calls “the result of a territorial dispute”. I still think the “Oh yeah!” is appropriate.

 

 

 

Our conclusions are sometimes necessarily tentative, but in spite of this I think they provide invaluable natural history details of the kind so rarely found in modern scientific studies, but which are crucial for both fundamental life history research and applied conservation efforts. I’ve included a sample (in the form of our Fig 3) below. Comments or requests for early view reprints are most welcome!

Plots showing fitted logistic curves with 95 % confidence interval (dotted lines) for the effect of male wing (left) and thorax (right) length on probability of dispersal. The data in this analysis include all emerged individuals, including those that were never re-sighted

Plots showing fitted logistic curves with 95 % confidence interval (dotted lines) for the effect of male wing (left) and thorax (right) length on probability of dispersal. The data in this analysis include all emerged individuals, including those that were never re-sighted

 

Posted on March 17, 2014, in Publications. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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